Finding God in the Secular Workplace: 4 Tips for Honoring Your Faith

Writing this post gives me major imposter syndrome. Who am I to advise anyone on keeping God and their Faith at the forefront of their day when I fail to do so many times? Know that as you read this, it is coming from someone who is also looking to do this more often; someone who wishes they had read this kind of article much earlier in life! It comes from a place of understanding and sincerity – I hope it helps in some way. The secular workplace (a place of work that is not a faith-based employer/organization) can be filled with opportunities to both honor your Faith and forget your Faith…it can be tricky and especially in today’s political climate.

I’ve been lucky enough to be employed into an environment where I’ve felt comfortable for the most part expressing my Faith when needed or asking to take time to go and do something Faith-related. That might look like using a lunch break to go to Daily Mass on First Fridays or using PTO so I can attend a Eucharistic Conference or even just having the privilege of taking a quick break to go and pray for five minutes in private. All the times I’ve ever felt embarrassed or scared to do something like make the Sign of the Cross or pray a Rosary in public, the fear has been self-imposed and I think that that is a phenomenon we’re seeing more frequently. People think everyone will care or be offended at what they’re doing when most of the time, as long as you’re respectful, they don’t. Even if they did, when it comes to your Faith, we (as in everyone: you AND I) need to be much more courageous in sharing it. So what if someone yells at us? Throws things or even beats us? Dare I say, even fire us?

Again, this can be much easier said than done. I know that. So I wanted to write some tips below to help begin taking those steps to being more fearless in our Catholic Faith (some I need to work on myself while others are things I try to do often). At the end of the day, the most important thing is that we try to live a life of Faith and devotion to the best of our ability. This will look different for everyone: some may be more outspoken and brave while others may be more quiet and private. The only time we fail is when we fail to defend Christ and our Faith from blatant evil or disrespect. There is a time and calling to everything and that is something each person must discern for themselves.

4 Things To Do To Honor God at Your Secular Workplace:

Religious Art and Quotes

The best way to begin a conversation about the Church as well as remind yourself of God’s presence in all things is through beauty! People love beautiful things and most of the time, it’s easy to get away with posting a picture of Jesus or the Blessed Virgin or any of the Saints on or near your desk. In my office, I have a few sticky notes with Scripture on the desktop as well as a card that has a Prayer for Life on it. Generally, I wear jewelry that always has something that draws back to my Faith – the miraculous medal around my neck, Crucifix earrings or Miraculous Medal earrings from The Little Catholic. I don’t necessarily recommend going this far but tattoos can even count in some ways as reminders – I have a tattoo of Magdalene with her alabaster jar of oil on my left wrist and a Memento Mori skull on my finger. There are many ways to intertwine the beauty of Sacred Art into your office or clothing and it’s usually a great way to start being more Faith-forward in a secular workplace.

Use Your PTO or Lunch Breaks for Church/Rest

Take time off! Use your PTO and lunch breaks to go to Mass or Confession or a Holy Hour. The whole point of PTO is to use it and what better way than to use it to balance your work life with your Spiritual Life. Perhaps take a long weekend to go on a Silent Retreat somewhere or attend a conference. If you’ve been feeling called to attending Daily Mass, try talking with your supervisor or employer about working out a schedule that fulfills your obligations but allows you to go to church when you want. Another big statement that I’ve noticed more Catholics slowly taking back is prioritizing Sunday as the Sabbath, a day of rest. If you’re able: don’t work – don’t answer emails, don’t answer calls, don’t answer text messages. Obviously, there are going to be some moments and careers that require working on Sundays (especially first responders, nurses, doctors etc.) but if you’re in any way able to not work and set strict boundaries to protect the sanctity of Sunday, do it.

Public Prayer

This for me is the hardest, even down to the Sign of the Cross, I get nervous praying in public. Some days I’m braver than others and will pray a Rosary with it laying in my lap and quietly muttering the prayers but other days temptation wins out and I look for a bathroom to sequester myself into to pray. For some of you, perhaps your environment may force you to pray in private – all of that is up to you, where you work, and the context of the situation. I think as long as we choose to pray instead of not (even if it’s silent), then we’ve chosen the narrow path and that’s good. Maybe set an alarm to go off at 12 PM or 3 PM, step away for a break to pray the Angelus or Divine Mercy Chaplet, respectively. Make the Sign of the Cross before your meal and make a point to pray for a minute or two before eating.

Talk About It

I work in a fairly open office where most of the time everyone gets along well. There are moments where I’ll get questions on why I’m eating less one day (fasting) or not eating meat or where I’m disappearing to on my lunch break — all asked respectfully, not interrogatively. And they are great opportunities to discuss Catholicism! So, I explain to the best of my ability why I abstain from meat on Fridays and sometimes fast or I’ll mention that I ran to confession or Mass real quick during my lunch break. There have been times where, again, I’ll chicken out for fear of ridicule or punishment but that’s never happened for me yet and I pray it doesn’t happen to anyone else. Keep in mind, someone responding in curiosity or even disagreement doesn’t mean it’s personal they might not be used to seeing a Catholic practice their Faith openly before. Stay hopeful and persist! If you’re able to fulfill your obligations to work while still making time for your own life and spiritual happiness, then there should be no problem. (I say it like that as an arguing point for you to use to your employer if need be – hopefully you won’t have to experience push back on trying to live your life outside of work).

Tell me in the comments your thoughts and what’s the hardest part about living in the world but not of it? Especially in the workplace?

Ad majorem Dei Gloriam,

The Joyful Servant

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